LSAT in a nutshell

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is an integral part of law school admission in various countries around the world including the United States, Canada, and a few others. The skills tested include a variety of aptitudes such as reading comprehension, reasoning, and writing.

Universities use the test results as part of the admissions process in order to assess an applicant’s suitability to their program and institution. This is, of course, in addition to all the other components of their application. It is used to determine the preparedness of students for law school studies. There have been numerous studies that revealed the LSAT is the single best predictor of first-year law school performance, even surpassing the staple GPA.

There are two parts to the LSAT.

  1. The first part is a multiple choice questions test that covers reading comprehension, analytical reasoning and logical reasoning questions.
    Section Time Limit / Types
    Section 1 23 questions in 35 minutes. Each set of questions in this section is based on a scenario with a set of conditions. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what can be logically inferred from the scenario and conditions.
    Section 2 & 3 25 questions in 35 minutes. The questions in this section are based on the reasoning contained in brief statements or passages. For some questions, more than one of the choices could conceivably answer the question. However, you are to choose the best answer
    Section 3 27 questions in 35 minutes. Each set of questions in this section is based on a single passage or a pair of passages. The questions are to be answered on the basis of what is stated or implied in the passage or pair of passages.
  2. The second part is a written essay known as LSAT Writing which is administered separately to the first section. It is administered online using a secure proctoring software on the candidate’s computer. This section is often completed (up to) 8 days prior to the multiple choice section.

The LSAT is the only test accepted by all ABA-accredited law schools. Some law schools will accept tests other than the LSAT for admission.

To know more about the nuances and subtleties of the test, or to know about the differences (and similarities) between the LSAT and LNAT, book an appointment with us!

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